Learn More About Viscosupplements

What is a viscosupplement?

A viscosupplement is a type of fluid that is injected directly into the knee to help lubricate and cushion the joint. Viscosupplements replace damage synovial fluid to help relieve pain and improve joint function.

What are viscosupplements made from?

Viscosupplements are made from a substance called hyaluronan. Hyaluronan is a natural substance found in the body and is present in very high amounts in joints. The body’s own hyaluronan acts like both a lubricant and shock absorber in the joint and is needed for the joint to work properly.

When should I consider a viscosupplement?

Viscosupplements are for people with Osteoarthritis of the knee who have not received enough pain relief from diet, exercise, and pain medication. If you’ve tried these options and are still feeling pain, ask our doctor if a viscosupplement could help.

What are the side effects?

Side effects with viscosupplements may include pain, swelling, or fluid build-up around the knee.

Knee Osteoarthritis Synvisc Treatment
Knee Osteoarthritis Synvisc Treatment

Ask our doctor about Synvisc – a targeted approach

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Prepare for your appointment

Be informed about viscosupplements

Who administers viscosupplement injections?

Our orthopaedic surgeon, Dr Kevin Yip.

How are viscosupplements given?

Viscosupplements are injected directly into the knee. Depending on the type of viscosupplement you receive, it may be given as a series of injections or as a single injection.

What is the procedure like?

Each injection takes a few minutes and can be given in our doctor’s office.

Will the injection hurt?

Our doctor will apply a numbing agent before your viscosupplement injection. You may feel some pressure, but is should not be painful.

What happens after the injection?

You can resume your normal day-to-day activities immediately after the injection, but you should avoid any strenuous activities for about 48 hours.

Call +65 6471 2674 today for an appointment with our doctor today.

 

When diet, exercise, and medication aren’t enough,

Learn More About Targeting Osteoarthritis (OA) Knee Pain at the Source.

You Don’t Have to Settle for Osteoarthritis Knee Pain

It’s time to find the right treatment option for you

Talking to our doctor is the best way to start exploring your treatment options.

And when you do, keep in mind:

Pain affects everyone differently

The severity of your osteoarthritis (OA) as it appears on an X-ray may not reflect the amount of pain you feel. Some people with OA that appears mild on an X-ray may feel a great deal of pain. Others, whose X-rays show severe OA, may feel less pain. Your doctor is relying on you to give a clear description of how your knee feels.

Xray of the Osteoarthritis Knee
Xray of the Osteoarthritis Knee

Osteoarthritis is caused by more that just cartilage loss

In knees with osteoarthritis, the cartilage protecting the ends of the bones gradually deteriorates, joint fluid loses its shock-absorbing qualities, and bones may begin to rub against each other – all of which may cause the knee pain you’re feeling.

Knee Osteoarthritis

It helps to know your Osteoarthritis treament option

There are several treatment options available for osteoarthritis knee pain.

These may include:

  • Lifestyle changes. such as exercises, physical therapy, and weight loss
  • Oral therapies, including pain relievers and nutritional supplements
  • Viscosupplement injections that provide pain relief when lifestyle changes and simple pain medications aren’t enough
  • Steroid injections in the knee
  • Surgery, such as total knee replacement

Talk to us about the risks and benefits of each treatment option to find an approach that is right for you.

Call +65 6471 2674 today.

 

Osteoarthritis – What is it and what symptoms would I experience?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects the cartilage (soft tissue that protects the bone surface) in your joints, causing it to break down and wear out. Knee OA is the most common form of this disease.

Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis:

  • Worn out cartilage
  • Decreased joint fluid

Signs and symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness at the joint
  • Stiffness (especially after getting out of bed or getting up from sitting for a long time)
  • Loss of flexibility
  • A grating feeling or the cracking sound of bone rubbing on bone.

How does knee OA develop? How do doctor diagnose it?

Knee OA develops when changes in the cartilage occur:

  • Cartilage becomes pitted, rough and brittle
  • Underlying bone thickens and broadens to reduce load on cartilage
  • Bony outgrowths form at the outer edges of the joint, making it look knobbly
  • Space inside the joint narrows. Bits of bone or cartilage can break off and float inside the joint space.

Diagnosis is usually made using several methods:

  • Medical history
  • Physical examination of the knee
  • X-rays or other imaging tests
  • Other tests such as blood tests or exams of the fluid in the joints.

What are the risks factors for OA?

  • Older age
  • Bone deformities
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Gender (women > men)
  • Joint injuries (sports or accidents)
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Certain occupations (that place repetitive stress on the knee)

What are my treatment options?

Lifestyle

  • Gentle exercise
  • Losing weight
  • Enough rest

Therapy

  • Physiotherapy
  • Braces / knee guards

Medications

  • Simple analgesics (paracetamol)
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Narcotics

Intrarticular injections

Surgery

Call +65 6471 2674 for Appointment

Call +65 6471 2674 (24 Hour) to get an appointment with our doctor today.

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children and teens are less common than in adults. But they do occur, especially in teens. An injury that hasn’t been treated (or one in which the treatment didn’t work) can lead to future knee problems. The knee may become more and more unstable. Over time, osteoarthritis may develop.

Trying rehab and other treatments

A child with an ACL injury can sometimes be treated without surgery to avoid damage to the child’s still-developing bones. Your child can try rehab exercises, wearing a brace, and avoiding activities that require jumping or twisting.

Studies suggest that the more active a child is, the less likely these treatments will work and the more likely surgery will be needed in the future.

An avulsion fracture is more common in young children. This happens when the ligament and a piece of bone separate from the rest of the bone. It can often be treated with a cast. But it sometimes needs surgery.

Having the ACL surgery

You may consider surgery if:

  • The knee is very unstable doing simple daily activities.
  • The knee can’t be made stable with other methods.
  • The child has both an ACL injury and a meniscus tear.
  • The child is a serious athlete in sports that require running, jumping, and stopping quickly.

Rest after surgery and a proper rehab program are very important.

Call (+65) 6471 2674 (24 Hour) for an appointment with our orthopaedic surgeon regarding the ACL injuries today.

Meniscus Tear Type

Meniscectomy is the surgical removal of all or part of a torn meniscus. A meniscus tear is a common knee joint injury. Surgeons who perform meniscectomies (orthopaedic surgeons) will make surgical decisions based on the meniscus’s ability to heal as well as your age, health, and activity level.

Your doctor will likely suggest the treatment that he or she thinks will work best for you based on where the tear is, the pattern of the tear, and how big it is. Your age, your health, and your activity level may also affect your treatment options. In some cases, the surgeon makes the final decision during surgery, when he or she can see the how strong the meniscus is, where the tear is, and how big the tear is.

  • If you have a small tear at the outer edge of the meniscus (in what doctors call thered zone), you may want to try home treatment. These tears often heal with rest.
  • If you have a moderate to large tear at the outer edge of the meniscus (red zone), you may want to think about surgery. These kinds of tears tend to heal well after surgery.
  • If you have a tear that spreads from the red zone into the inner two-thirds of the meniscus (called the white zone), your decision is harder. Surgery to repair these kinds of tears may not work.
  • If you have a tear in the white zone of the meniscus, repair surgery usually isn’t done, because the meniscus may not heal. But partial meniscectomy may be done if torn pieces of meniscus are causing pain and swelling.

There are different types of meniscus tears. The pattern of the tear may determine whether a tear can be repaired. Horizontal and flap tears typically require surgical removal of at least part of the meniscus.

Meniscus Tear Type

How Meniscectomy done for a Meniscus Tear

The choice of type of surgery is based on the size and location of the tear, your age and activity level, the surgeon’s experience, and your preferences. Orthopedic surgeons most often perform meniscus surgery with arthroscopy, a procedure used to both examine and repair the inside of a joint. A thin tube (arthroscope) containing a camera and light is inserted through small incisions near the joint. Surgical instruments are inserted through other small incisions. Arthroscopic surgery may limit knee damage from surgery and may promote fuller recovery. But some tears may require open knee surgery.

Knee arthroscopy external view

In a total meniscectomy, the entire meniscus is removed. In a partial meniscectomy, the surgeon removes as little of the meniscus as possible. Unstable meniscal fragments are removed, and the remaining meniscus edges are smoothed so that there are no frayed ends.

You may have general or regional anaesthesia for a meniscectomy. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is commonly done in an outpatient surgical center.

What To Expect After Meniscectomy for a Meniscus Tear

Rehabilitation (rehab) varies depending on the injury, the type of surgery, your orthopaedic surgeon’s preference, and your age, health status, and activities. Time periods vary, but meniscus surgery is usually followed by a period of rest, walking, and selected exercises. Most people who have arthroscopic meniscectomy can bear weight a day or two after surgery and can return to full activity within 2 to 4 weeks. After the full range of motion without pain is possible, you can return to your previous activity level.

The timetable for returning to walking, driving, and more vigorous activities will depend on the type and extent of the surgery and your success in rehab.

Why Meniscectomy Is Done

A decision to remove all or part of your meniscus will take into consideration the location, length, tear pattern, and stability of the tear as well as the condition of the whole meniscus. Your surgeon will also consider the condition of the entire knee, your age, and any age- or injury-related degeneration.

If a meniscus tear is causing pain or swelling, it probably means that torn pieces of the meniscus need to be removed and the edges surgically shaved to make the remaining meniscus smooth. Your orthopaedic surgeon will try to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible to prevent long-term degeneration of your knee and allow you to return to full activities.

Call (+65) 6471 2674 (24 Hour) to make an appointment to see our orthopaedic specialist regarding meniscectomy today.