Is hyaluronic acid joint injections right for me?

If knee pain is keeping you from doing what you love and you have tried other treatments (pain relievers, exercise, physiotherapy, cortisone injections) and nothing seems to work or is no longer effective. hyaluronic acid joint injection may be right for you.

Are there any special treatment instructions?

You will be able to go home immediately after your injections. You should have no problems walking or driving. However, for the first 48 hours after treatment, it is recommended that you avoid strenuous activities such as jogging, tennis and heavy lifting.

Are there any side effects?

The most commonly reported adverse events include temporary pain at the injection site. Cold compresses and painkillers should alleviate this temporary discomfort post injection. Hyaluronic acid joint injection should not be given to patients with infections or skin diseases in the are of the injection site.

Why hyaluronic acid joint injections?

Many unknowingly take painkillers for extended periods of time to provide temporary pain relief, without realising the side effects. Most doctors limit steroid injections to three of four in a lifetime as the effects of multiple doses can damage cartilage and connective tissue.

Is hyaluronic acid joint injection painful?

The procedure usually only takes a few minutes and most patients experience little or no discomfort. The doctor will usually begin by cleaning the injection site with alcohol or iodine. A local anaesthetic may also be administered to numb the knee and make the injection as comfortable as possible.

Osteoarthritis – What is it and what symptoms would I experience?

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease that affects the cartilage (soft tissue that protects the bone surface) in your joints, causing it to break down and wear out. Knee OA is the most common form of this disease.

Knee Osteoarthritis


  • Worn out cartilage
  • Decreased joint fluid

Signs and symptoms

  • Pain and tenderness at the joint
  • Stiffness (especially after getting out of bed or getting up from sitting for a long time)
  • Loss of flexibility
  • A grating feeling or the cracking sound of bone rubbing on bone.

How does knee OA develop? How do doctor diagnose it?

Knee OA develops when changes in the cartilage occur:

  • Cartilage becomes pitted, rough and brittle
  • Underlying bone thickens and broadens to reduce load on cartilage
  • Bony outgrowths form at the outer edges of the joint, making it look knobbly
  • Space inside the joint narrows. Bits of bone or cartilage can break off and float inside the joint space.

Diagnosis is usually made using several methods:

  • Medical history
  • Physical examination of the knee
  • X-rays or other imaging tests
  • Other tests such as blood tests or exams of the fluid in the joints.

What are the risks factors for OA?

  • Older age
  • Bone deformities
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Gender (women > men)
  • Joint injuries (sports or accidents)
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Certain occupations (that place repetitive stress on the knee)

What are my treatment options?


  • Gentle exercise
  • Losing weight
  • Enough rest


  • Physiotherapy
  • Braces / knee guards


  • Simple analgesics (paracetamol)
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Narcotics

Intrarticular injections


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What is a Meniscus Tear?

A meniscus tear is a common knee injury. The meniscus is a rubbery, C-shaped disc that cushions your knee. Each knee has two menisci (plural of meniscus)—one at the outer edge of the knee and one at the inner edge. The menisci keep your knee steady by balancing your weight across the knee. A torn meniscus can prevent your knee from working right.

Knee Cartilage, Meniscus and Ligament


What Causes a Meniscus Tear?

A meniscus tear is usually caused by twisting or turning quickly, often with the foot planted while the knee is bent. Meniscus tears can occur when you lift something heavy or play sports. As you get older, your meniscus gets worn. This can make it tear more easily.

What are the Symptoms for Meniscus Tear?

There are three types of meniscus tears. Each has its own set of symptoms.

With a minor tear, you may have slight pain and swelling. This usually goes away in 2 or 3 weeks.

moderate tear can cause pain at the side or center of your knee. Swelling slowly gets worse over 2 or 3 days. This may make your knee feel stiff and limit how you can bend your knee, but walking is usually possible. You might feel a sharp pain when you twist your knee or squat. These symptoms may go away in 1 or 2 weeks but can come back if you twist or overuse your knee. The pain may come and go for years if the tear isn’t treated.

In severe tears, pieces of the torn meniscus can move into the joint space. This can make your knee catch, pop, or lock. You may not be able to straighten it. Your knee may feel “wobbly” or give way without warning. It may swell and become stiff right after the injury or within 2 or 3 days.

If you are older and your meniscus is worn, you may not know what you did to cause the tear. You may only remember feeling pain after you got up from a squatting position, for example. Pain and slight swelling are often the only symptoms.

How is a Meniscus Tear Diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask about past injuries and what you were doing when your knee started to hurt. A physical exam will help your doctor find out if a torn meniscus is the cause of your pain. Your doctor will look at both knees and check for tenderness, range of motion, and how stable your knee is.

You may need to meet with an orthopaedic surgeon for more testing. These tests may include an MRI, which can give a clear picture of where a tear is and how serious it is.

How is Meniscus Tear Treated?

How your doctor treats your meniscus tear depends on several things, such as the type of tear, where it is, and how serious it is. Your age and how active you are may also affect your treatment choices.

Treatment may include:

  • Rest, ice, wrapping the knee with an elastic bandage, and propping up the leg on pillows.
  • Physical therapy.
  • Arthroscopy surgery to repair the meniscus.

Knee Arthroscopy and Meniscus Repair

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Brief Outline of ACL Injury

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the four ligaments of the knee and it holds the knee together from the front. An ACL injury commonly happens in sports where there are a lot of direction changes and possible impacts. Football, basketball, and other fast moving games that require quick changes often result in ACL sprains. The most common mechanism for this injury is when the knee rotates while the foot is planted. Sharp pain at the time of the injury, accompanied by swelling in the knee joint, may be a sign of an ACL tear. This can range from minor tearing of a few fibres to a complete tear. The ACL can also be torn as the result of a hard blow to the knee; usually other ligaments and the meniscus are involved as well.

Cause of ACL Injury

Forceful twisting of the knee when the foot is planted. Occasionally a forceful blow to the knee, especially if the foot is fixed as well.

Signs and Symptoms of ACL Injury

Pain immediately after injury that may go away later. Swelling in the knee joint. Instability in the knee, especially with the tibia.

Complications if Left ACL Injury Unattended

If left unattended this injury may not heal properly. The instability in the joint could result in injury of other ligaments. Chronic pain and instability could lead to future limitations.

Treatment for ACL Injury

ACL sprains that involve a complete tear usually require surgery, ACL Reconstruction using Arthroscopy method, to reattach the ligament. Minor sprains can often be healed completely without surgery.

Rehabilitation and Prevention for ACL Injury

Once stability and strength return and pain subsides, activities such as stationary cycling can be gradually introduced. Range of motion and strengthening exercises are an important part of rehabilitation. Swimming and other exercises that are non-weight bearing may be used until the strength returns to normal. Strengthening the muscles of the quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves will help to protect the ACL. Proper conditioning before beginning high impact activities will also provide protection.

Call Now (+65) 6471 2674 (24 Hours) to see our knee specialist today regarding your ACL injury.