A harmless but painful bony enlargement on the outer posterior heel is called a Haglund’s deformity, named for the doctor who first described it. This condition is commonly referred to as a “pump bump”, because women’s pump-style shoes, with rigid heel counters, contribute to its symptoms. Given this common name, it isn’t surprising that Haglund’s deformity occurs most frequently in women who spend a lot of time wearing dressing shoes

Haglund's Deformity

What Causes Haglund’s Deformity?

Most people with Haglund’s deformity have inherited a foot structure with this bony enlargement present at birth. With pressure and rubbing on the heel over time, a bursa forms and becomes inflamed and painful (bursitis). High-arched feet, in particular, tend to supinate when walking (inward movement of the heel causing a person to walk on the outside of the heel), causing the back of the heel to rub repetitively against the shoe’s heel counter. A tight or shortened Achilles tendon also contributes to the condition by compressing another bursa (the retrocalcaneal bursa, which everybody has) against the heel bone.

Symptoms of Haglund’s Deformity

Symptoms of Haglund’s deformity include pain, redness, and swelling at the back of the heel. Often, a callus also develops over the affected area.

Treatment of Haglund’s Deformity

Treatment of Haglud’s deformity begins with

If the above conservative treatments are not helpful, you may want to consider surgery. The procedure usually involves removing both the prominent bony enlargement on the back of the heel bone and the inflamed bursa.

Please call +65 64712674 for an appointment for treating Haglund’s deformity.